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Showing posts from August, 2008

Ad Infinitum

Health is considered to be one of the most valued possessions man could ever dream. Man always pursue for youthful image and tangible health in order to meet the demands from his environment. Most of the time, he wanted to reach the pinnacle where everything is perfect and order. In his quest towards perfection, he would defy advanced age, combat infirmity and would even settle in trading wealth in favor of health. Nonetheless, no matter how hard he tries to reach for that so called pinnacle; still the inevitable would stand out, the disease itself. Where man goes, disease follows and where man exists, disease coexists. Hence, man’s quest for eternal perfection seems to be ad infinitum.

Long before science was a breakthrough, diseases were paralleled to that of an evil, a curse, or worst, a tribulation from the Omniscient. Man often viewed them to be horrendous. Moreover, people who were stricken with such lethal diseases were left hopeless and abandoned. They were outcasts then. But a…

Music in a Boat

Among the many indigenous instruments that I love to hear the most is the Hegalong, a plucked instrument that is supported only by two strings and is artistically shaped into a boat like lute. what's interesting with this instrument is it creates a melodic tune distinct only in its type. Like all other boat-lutes, the body and neck is carved from one piece of (soft)wood, with the resonator chamber carved from the back, and covered with a thin wooden board, with a soundhole in it. The length of the instrument can be from about 1 to even 2 meters. The picture depicts a Matigsalog man playing the kudlong. This instrument comes under many different names, although they all look quite similar : kudlung, fagelung, hagelung, kudyapiq, ketiyapiq, kusyapiq, etc.
The two metal strings are tuned with two tuning pegs on the side of the pegbox. The bridge (which is also the stringholder) is a raised block of wood on the front. The strings run through small holes to the tuning pegs. The frets a…

Kadayawan Melon Treat

Last week at the height of Kadayawan festivity, I decided to visit Museo Dabawenyo for the second time around. Seeing a variety of indigenous works displayed in the museum is a scenery that made want to even stay at the place for a longer time. While browsing the works of Anoy Catague, I was approached by these three familiar people and a female voice said in vernacular, "Hoy, gauno kaw ngadi, ama kaw lagi nang turista!!" ("Hey, what are you doing here? you look like a tourist"), I was surprised to see that they were actually my high school friends who also took time to visit the place. We immediately get into the conversation about what happedned to us lately.
These three people I'm refering to were Mae wearing a pink shirt with a white strap, Rajiv in his Polo shirt much like a politico and Kiki in Red polka dots shirt. Mae just graduated in college and is busy in her school requirements. Rajiv is a cousin and is planning to go back in college. Kiki, a kababa…

Tagalog en Bisaya sa Dabaw

How can one distinguish a Davaoeno from a Cebuano? or to a Cagayanon? Difficult? Easy. Davaoenos are one of the most unique people in the world. We can easily stand out if we are placed in a crowd of Filipinos from other parts of the country. And how, you say? Language.

Davao City, aptly called the melting pot of cultures, is home to many dialects. Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilonggo, Ilocano, Chavacano, Moslem, Bicolano. Name it, we'll speak it. If the Filipino language is a composition of all the dialects and languages in the Philippines, you might as well say that the language we speak in Davao City is the real Filipino language, and not Tagalog. However, since it is a hodgepodge of different tongues, it is sometimes funny to hear our language "bastardizing" , for lack of better word, the other dialects. Strangely, that distinguishes us from the rest. Try these... In stating a fact, Manilenos say, "Talagang mabait si Weng." In Davao, we say. "Mabait bitaw gyud si…

Who are the Mandayas?

1. Mandaya, literally means “upstream or upland dweller”, is one of the natives in Eastern Mindanao particularly the province of Davao Oriental. The typical Mandaya has a fair complexion, black sawed teeth, relatively well-defined nose and, sometimes, aquiline.

Beliefs 2. The Mandayas believed on the two-fold principles of good and evil, which are represented by the good gods Mansilatan and Badla (father and son), and Pundaugnon and Malimbong (husband and wife) as the evil gods.
Dagmay Weaving and Rituals

3.Known for their artistic embroidery, hand-woven costumes (dagmay) and animistic rituals, the Mandayas have distinctive literary and ritualistic devices to celebrate their tribal life and belief in the form of bayok (epic song or impromptu incantation), dawot (love song), uyog-uyog (lullaby) and ritualistic dance headed by the balyan or babailan (high priest or priestess) similar to shaman.

The Bird of Omen

4.The limocon or limoken, an endangered specie in the eastern part of Davao, is a…

Mandaya Dagmay Weaving

The Mandaya is one of Mindanao’s surviving minority tribes of the Philippines. They live in the mountainous areas above the coastal town of Davao Oriental particularly in Boston, Cateel, Bagangga, Caraga and Manay. For many generations the Mandaya have woven cloth from fibers of native abaca tree, a variety of the banana family, which is abundant in the region. The finest grade of hemp extracted from abaca stalks is stripped pounded, combed then prepared for dyeing by tying thus, the word tie-dye. The dyes are made from mud, root and other organic materials. This cloth is known locally as dagmay. It is distinguished from other tribal weaving by the intricate figures and patterns depicting the folklores and religion of the tribe. The Mandaya have carried the human and crocodile motifs to their highest expression. The crocodile is held sacred as shown by the frequency with which it appears in their decorative design. This art is handed down from generation. There is no patterns copy. E…

Mandaya Weaving

The Mandaya is one of Mindanao’s surviving minority tribes of the Philippines. They live in the mountainous areas above the coastal towns of Davao Oriental particularly Boston, Cateel, Bagangga, Caraga and Manay.
For many generations the Mandaya have woven cloth from fibers of native abaca tree, a variety of the banana family, which is abundant in the region. The finest grade of hemp extracted from abaca stalks is stripped pounded, combed then prepared for dyeing by tying thus, the word tie-dye. The dyes are made from mud, root and other organic materials.
This cloth is known locally as dagmay. It is distinguished from other tribal weaving by the intricate figures and patterns depicting the folklores and religion of the tribe. The Mandaya have carried the human and crocodile motifs to their highest expression. The crocodile is held sacred as shown by the frequency with which it appears in their decorative design. This art is handed down from generation. There is no patterns copy. Each d…

Collage Artwork (Anoy Catague)

Last week's celebration of Kadayawan 2008 is truly unforgettable and nostalgic. the festivity brought so many vivid memories of my childhood days. My short immersion and interaction with the different lumad tribes was remarkable. the scar of animosity was there and the excitement even runned down from the depth of my veins as I mingle with them and knowing that from these veins thrive a portion of a Mandayan blood within me. Every single breath coming from my lungs and every sweat coming from my skin was nothing because of the thrill and eagerness to be in the events relevant to the celebration. One unforgettable experience I have is when I got the sheer chance to visit Museo Dabawenyo situated along Magallanes Street. Upon entering the said haven, I was in awe and excitement, the feeling I had that time was like Harry Potter in his first yeat at Hogwarts whose innocence and naivity brought him to an unlikely adventure inside the magical school. While inside the museum I happened …

Mr. BUSY

Time really flies fast. Imagine, I was not able to update my blog for like more than a month because of the fact that I was damn busy with my school stuffs. It was a rush for me everyday at school. Filing for PRC is coming to its end, our schedule is sometime at September and I am still hoping that I can finish it. I am schedule to take the NLE this November and of course I am very excited for it. Sooner, I can have my license to practice professionally. As for now, I am just so busy. I wonder when will Mr. Busy have his rest. lol. hasta luego.

hello world

Time flies really fast for me, imagine, I was not able to update my blog for like a month or so and haven't heard from the cyberworld lately because of my school stuffs. lol. I was working double time with my PRC requirements so that I can take the NLE 2008 this coming November. sigh. These few months was awful and tiring. I imagined myself stacked inside a small jar desperate to break free. Anyways, I am so happy that I am back again here doing my blog. I just missed this. yahoo. I got a bad news actually. And I am so upset because of that. My body just balloned itself more than i expect it to be. I don't know, Am I depressed that I crave for yummy grafrafmm foods? lol. As for the moment, I am getting myself a dose of self-discipline on food choice and consumption. arg. until then